Urban Design Studio I: Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation, Columbia University


REDHOOK: THE DESTINATION FOR RECREATION

Category : 2011 · No Comments · by January 4, 2012
REDHOOK: THE DESTINATION FOR RECREATION

Brooklyn / Red Hook Harsha BaladevaKrishna / Rishab Jain / Xiaoming Zhang Red Hook a neighborhood as a character which…

re. designing Rockaways: a blue[r] system

Category : 2011 · No Comments · by January 4, 2012
re. designing Rockaways: a blue[r] system

Queens / Rockaways Jaewoo Chung / Clara Goitia / Revati Naraya Addressing the rising issues of climate change [surge, storm…

The Belt

Category : 2011 · No Comments · by November 18, 2011

Brooklyn / Red Hook
Kristal Javier  /  Marina Marquez  /  Andres Correa

Our vision is to recover Redhook’s original character as a production region by implementing a Green tech Belt system that will incentivize manufacturing to stay in New York City. We envision Redhook being a prototype for a food hub to better the quality of life and alleviate health problems such as obesity. Obesity costs 7.6 billion dollars to New York State annually. By investing in new infrastructures that will provide new jobs and fresh food in every Borough, drastic cost cuts can be made and social conditions can be improved.

Urban Ecotone

Category : 2011 · No Comments · by November 18, 2011

Staten Island / South Beach
Elango Gvindan, SeJin Jo, Paul Nelson

The bluebelt system in Staten Island is unique to this borough, providing an opportunity for transformative urban design. We have specifically focused on new creek, its wetlands and surrounding watershed. This freshwater wetland, fed by spring water and surface runoff from surrounding development, is unique because it is one of few palustrine emergent wetlands remaining in New York City. The existing neighborhood fabric is fragmented, describing a sharp edge between wetland and neighborhood, resulting in negligence and encroachment of natural systems. We are using the new creek bluebelt for more than stormwater management, through the design of an urban ecotone that benefits both the neighboring community and natural ecosystem. This solution will address public access, new policy, zoning, and building typology through the rethinking of new creek’s bluebelt boundary.

Claiming Highway

Category : 2011 · No Comments · by November 18, 2011

Manhattan / East Harlem
Minyoung Kim / Wassim Shaaban / Johannes Pointl / Zetong Jiao

The objective of this proposal is to create a healthier environment that will nourish an active and communal lifestyle for the residents of East Harlem. This will be done by reorganizing and re-prioritizing the hierarchies of the existing transportation sysem, which is one of the leading causes of poor health – such as high occurrences of asthma – on site.

By doing so we are able to significantly reduce air pollution in East Harlem, and create tree opportunities that will 1) help revitalize and rethink the car dominant waterfront (FDR Drive), 2 connect the community to their waterfront, and 3) provide an easier and more direct connection to Randall’s Island. We propose both soft and hard interventions that speak to the existing urban fabric and its materiality and create physical and programmatic community links that are derived from their own needs.

East Harlem low line

Category : 2011 · No Comments · by November 7, 2011

Manhattan / East Harlem
Felicity Stewart / Hannah Allawi / Chao Dong

Whilst East Harlem is a vibrant, unique part of New York City, the community is also one of the most disadvantaged. East Harlem has an abundance of unbuilt space compared with
the rest of the city but has a severe lack of green space conducive to outdoor activity and exercise. There is also an alarming asthma rate exacerbated by poor public housing
conditions and traffic pollution. This condition is most severe at the water’s edge. The 6 lane FDR dominates the waterfront, prohibiting access to the water and having negative health
impacts on the housing and schools which line the road. The existing waterfront provides a 30m wide strip of space that is highly inaccessible and limited in program. Randall’s island, just 150m away, has expansive open space and exceptional recreational facilties. Our project aims to redefine East Harlem’s waterfront and also the Manhattan waterfront by connecting East Harlem and Randall’s Island. We considered the space of the water as a field and asked, what can the space of the water become?
The East Harlem Low Line is a transformative superimposed infrastructure that enables healthy activity and connectivity in for this distinct community. It creates a tidal multipurpose
landscape across the water, encouraging people to take part in an array of programs which are an extension of activities and events that already occur in the community in unhealthy settings. The Low Line is an undulating structural terrain which folds its way over, across, through and under the East Harlem landscape, river and built fabric. It is a bridge, a theatre,
a boardwalk, a marina, a wetland habitat, a science lab, a façade and a garden.

WET Network

Category : 2011 · No Comments · by November 7, 2011

Staten Island / South Beach
Ana Jimenez / Fernando Arias / Florence Huang / Denise Preschel

Staten Island’s regional waterfront parks are an integral part of their local communities, but lack an organized and integrated connection among them.
With special accessibility considerations to the concentration of elderly and disabled residents of South Beach, we
envision Staten Island’s “wet networks” as a catalyst for accessible recreation for the local community and large-scale sporting events, while sensitively addressing the ecology of the South Beach landscape.

Enabling Growth

Category : 2011 · No Comments · by November 7, 2011

Manhattan / East Harlem
Lowell Day / Phoebe Sicong / Gilmar Campos / Richard Off

Our project calls for the expansion of East Harlem’s schools out into the neighborhood  through the installation of a flexible, evolving infrastructure in underutilized spaces as a means ofengaging youths in a variety of programming.  In doing so, a new network is physically established that simultaneously provides a framework for the healthy growth of both theneighborhood and its children.  By engaging both public and private spaces, the system can become a permanent fixture in the urban fabric while also influencing future growth and development patterns in a way that more acutely addresses the community’s existing needs.

 

SCAPE3

Category : 2011 · No Comments · by November 4, 2011

Queens / Rockaways
Parnika Ray-Centeno / Irene Papadopoulos / Sobin Lee

Rethinking the Middle Landscape of the Rockaway Peninsula

Access to community resources in the Rockaways is limited due to existing transit infrastructure.  We propose a re-envisioning of the current infrastructural paradigm for the equitable distribution of assets. A localized tram line along Rockaway Beach Boulevard, a series of revitalized corridors, and new datums for social exchange, create a dynamic landscape which improves the non-physical health of the Rockaways by reestablishing the dialogue between individuals and their built environment. This new landscape generates conditions for integration of existing and future assets, thereby redefining the identity of the Rockaways and establishing a sense of place.

FLUX

Category : 2011 · No Comments · by November 4, 2011

Queens / Rockaways
Eri Szuki / Nefeli Kalantzi / Tzu-Pei Jeng / Matt Henry

FLUX:  A state of motion / movement

In order to create healthier communities, we propose ab urban design framework that breaks barriers, synergizes programs, and embraces the natural environment. This framework’s strategies are generally applicable to several areas of the Rockaways Peninsula; they are applied specifically to the Sommerville / Arverne communities. The resultant design creates a fluid, dynamic space that exists both within and between these two communities. As such, the space supports both the known programs and the unknown. It is always in a state of FLUX.