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Retrofitting Brazil’s Soccer Stadiums with Housing

‘casa futebol’ by 1week1project proposes the reappropriation of the stadiums renovated or built for the 2014 FIFA world cup in brazil. within the host country, the housing shortage is estimated to be at 5.2 million homes according to the institute of applied economic research.

 

as one commenter remarks on the designers website, the proposed modules at 105m2 are almost 3 ties the size of Brazil’s housing program Minha Casa Minha Vida offers.

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C-Rock: Jumping into the Harlem River

C-Rock from Eric Branco on Vimeo.

C-Rock is a new documentary about a pastime that, for kids in the northwest Bronx, is “like a bar mitzvah.” Except that it entails jumping dozens of feet off of rocky cliffs into the Harlem River, where that waterway meets Spuyten Duyvil Creek. (It got its name because Columbia University athletes painted a big C on the rock face.) Fellow teens and Circle Line patrons bear witness to these daring dives, while older men—always men—reminisce about their plunges, which are virtually synonymous with adolescence. Learn more about this ritual and read an interview with the film maker on Curbed

Want to see C-Rock? It’ll screen on Wednesday August 6 at NewFilmMakers. There’s also a community screening at Word Up bookstore on July 19 at 7:30 p.m. Then, in the fall, it’ll be at the New York City Independent Film Festival from October 15 to 19.

Reducing Parking makes housing more affordable

Late last month, leaders in Sao Paulo approved a strategic master plan that will go a long way toward making the city more walkable and transit-oriented. The plan eliminates minimum parking requirements citywide and imposes parking maximums — one space per residence — along transit corridors. Getting rid of parking minimums is expected to reduce traffic and make housing more affordable.

Sao Paulo is the first “megacity in the developing world” to entirely eliminate parking minimums, according to the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy. Many major U.S. cities have dropped parking minimums in their downtown areas, but so far none has applied this smart policy reform citywide.

“By reducing parking around transit corridors, São Paulo will start reducing traffic, improving street life, and encouraging the use of public transit,” writes ITDP. “Though parking minimums have long fallen out of favor in many American and European cities, São Paulo is leading the way for cities in developing countries to pass major parking reform, making the city more transit and pedestrian friendly.”

… and speaking of parking: check out this article on streetsblog, Council Member chin is asking DOT to give up the parking structures they operate often providing parking at a lower cost than private parking operators to build affordable housing instead.

Here is a map of city-owned parking structures

Mapping Dollar Vans

This week’s New Yorker published its interactive project of “shadow transit systems” in New York City.

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In 1980, when a transit strike halted buses and subway trains throughout New York’s five boroughs, residents in some of the most marooned parts of the city started using their own cars and vans to pick people up, charging a dollar to shuttle them to their destinations. Eleven days later, the strike ended, but the cars and vans drove on, finding huge demand in neighborhoods that weren’t well served by public transit even when buses and trains were running. The drivers eventually expanded their businesses, using thirteen-seat vans to create routes in places like Flatbush, Jamaica, Far Rockaway, and downtown Brooklyn. Read more and see videos of the various systems here

Accidental Skyline Air Rights

The Municipal Arts Society created an online map to show available development rights. Whether developed on site or purchased as “air rights” by neighboring developments, the map gives an overview of how much development potential exists in all five boroughs under current zoning.

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Catch-22 Housing Co-ops

This weekend the NY Times published an article that gives an insight on H.D.F.C., or Housing Development Fund Corporation — a form of co-op housing intended for low-income New Yorkers. There are an estimated 25,800 of these apartments across some 1,200 buildings, according to the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development.While there are restrictions on the income a buyer can make when purchasing a limited-income co-op, there are no restrictions on the sale price.

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An HDFC building in Harlem

So how can someone with an income of  $60,000 afford an apartment for half a million dollars? Read the full article to understand this type of Co-op.

Total Reset

Some images of the opening of Total Reset from Wednesday, June 25th. The exhibition will continue through August 10th and the collection of “postcards from home” will be growing until then.

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Photos by Christian Hansen, courtesy Institute for Public Architecture

Designer Affordable Housing in the Bronx

RUGGED BUT RIGHTEOUS:

David Adjaye debuts affordable housing development in New York CIty.01-david-adjaye-sugar-hill-housing-nyc-archpaper

 

This is the location where the 5 Borough Studio exhibit will be located as part of the  first ever Institute for Public Architecture Fellows.  Check the blog post “If you Build It” below for more information about the Fellow and the exhibit.

Look forward to seeing many of you at the exhibit June 25th from 7-9 pm at 155th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue.

 

Mapping Urban Renewal

The City of New York has adopted over 150 master plans for our neighborhoods. You can see which areas have been affected and what those grand plans were here.

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Neighborhood master plans – often called “urban renewal plans” – were adopted to get federal funding for acquiring land, relocating the people living there, demolishing the structures and making way for new public and private development. Plan adoptions started in 1949 and many plans remain active today. Development in the plan areas sometimes happened, like Lincoln Center, and sometimes didn’t, like many still-vacant lots in East New York and Bushwick. Areas were selected for renewal because they were considered blighted or obsolete. The “blight” designation always came from outside the communities that got that label – from inspectors working for the mayor’s Committee on Slum Clearance in the early period and Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) employees in the later period. This online map was produced by 596 Acres together with Partner & Partners and SmartSign showing all urban renewal areas in the for New York City.

 

 

If you build it

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The 5 Borough Studio is among the first-ever Institute for Public Architecture Fellows. In residence this summer in Harlem as part of No Longer Empty’s “If You Build It” exhibition, the Fellows will develop four innovative research and design proposals for public and affordable housing in New York. The residency, exhibition, and public programs continue the IPA “Total Reset” series on housing. As part of the residency, the studio will investigate the relationship between “housing” and “home” and “what makes New York City a home?”. We will do this through a series of postcards from home, drawn and written collaboratively with a wide variety of New Yorkers.

The exhibition, curated by No Longer Empty in partnership with Broadway Housing Communities will be installed in BHCs newest building, an affordable housing development, designed by architect David Adjaye in Sugar Hill in Harlem. Exhibits will occupy the apartments of the almost complete building prior to its residents moving in.

Come to the opening on June 25th, 7-9pm at 155th Street & St Nicholas Avenue

 

Active Mapping

Active Mapping

There are all kinds of great maps; historical and landform maps are some of my favorites.  Some maps give us lots of spatial information, such as a tourist map of a city, while other maps focus on one type of information, such as bike or transit maps.  Maps are of great interest to urban designers.  And, the act of mapping is as important to the design process as drawing sections or creating beautiful renderings.  Map-making for the purpose of design is an active process between you, as the choreographer of the map, and the information you are gathering from your site.  This is a subjective, political and personal narrative that you are creating with a base “map” as your canvas.  It is you (and your team) that ultimately decides what to include and not include on your maps.

The act of mapping extrudes the information that is most relevant and significant to your site and represents its spatial significance in relation to something else.  This something else can be a different scale (that of a region or of a particular building), another piece of data (such as the relationship between lack of open space and high obesity rates in an neighborhood), or various places or landmarks on your site (such as the relative distances between transit nodes and housing within a neighborhood).  Active mapping should demonstrate a clear “cause and effect”.  Maps for urban design do not need to show us everything about a site but rather communicate meaning about the site, the “aha” moments, and revelations that reveal hidden hypothesis.  They should imply directionality towards various design scenarios.

The following images are examples of maps that show a clear choreographed process and good editing by designers working at various sites.  They range in scales and types of content but all demonstrate the value of maps in telling important stories about our sites, stories that cannot be discovered with data alone.  Additional links are included for more map examples.

LINKS:

http://infosthetics.com/   (a blog of examples of data visualization)

http://www.spatialinformationdesignlab.org/projects.php?id=16  (The million dollar block)

http://www.msaudcolumbia.org/summer/?page_id=4  (Summer Studio map resource page)

http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2012/09/12/160996525/odd-things-happen-when-you-chop-up-cities-and-stack-them-sideways

http://projects.nytimes.com/census/2010/explorer

http://survapp.co

http://bklynr.com/block-by-block-brooklyns-past-and-present/

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammassalik_wooden_maps

http://sweeten.com/maps

http://www.urbanobservatory.org/compare/index.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/22/business/in-climbing-income-ladder-location-matters.html?_r=1&adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1389369757-5opRt/qr1Oi/az9dWOxIrQ&

BOOKS:

“Petrochemical America” by Kate Orff (Spring Studio Professor) and Richard Misrach.  Ben Abelman, Summer faculty worked on this publication as well!

“Envisioning Information” and “Visual Explanation” by Edward Tufte

Figure 1.0. Credit: WE Design and Health X Design:  Map showing the relationship between access to current and potential disaster relief centers and the “quality” of the streetscape in Freeport, Long Island, measured in number of trees.

Figure 1.0. Credit: WE Design and Health X Design:  Map showing the relationship between access to current and potential disaster relief centers and the “quality” of the streetscape in Freeport, Long Island, measured in number of trees.

Figure 2.0.  Credit: WE Design and Health x Design:  Map showing the relationship between perceived numbers of people and bike presence related to income levels along a underutilized commercial corridor in Freeport, Long Island

Figure 2.0.  Credit: WE Design and Health x Design:  Map showing the relationship between perceived numbers of people and bike presence related to income levels along a underutilized commercial corridor in Freeport, Long Island

 

Figure 3.0. Credit:  Warner Kuntz and Denise Hoffman Brandt:  Emerging Ecologies to an increasingly urban world

Figure 3.0. Credit:  Warner Kuntz and Denise Hoffman Brandt:  Emerging Ecologies to an increasingly urban world

Figure 4.0.  Credit:  James Khamsi FIRM a.d 20th St Access: This is a map of accessibility to green spaces in Chelsea that was part of a project we did for the Friends of the 20th St Park.

Figure 4.0.  Credit:  James Khamsi FIRM a.d 20th St Access: This is a map of accessibility to green spaces in Chelsea that was part of a project we did for the Friends of the 20th St Park.

Figure 5.0. Credit: James Khamsi.  Huburbs-0: This is a comparison of density and transit ridership patterns in different North American cities

Figure 5.0. Credit: James Khamsi.  Huburbs-0: This is a comparison of density and transit ridership patterns in different North American cities

Figure 6.0. Credit: James Khamsi and Kathleen Cayetano, Huburbs. Huburbs-2: This is a comparison of 4 modes of transportation that cross Toronto: highway, the proposed Eglington LRT, the Bloo-Danforth TTC Subway line and the Queens Street TTC Street Car. They are made in space and then mapped in time relative to their speeds.

Figure 6.0. Credit: James Khamsi and Kathleen Cayetano, Huburbs. Huburbs-2: This is a comparison of 4 modes of transportation that cross Toronto: highway, the proposed Eglington LRT, the Bloo-Danforth TTC Subway line and the Queens Street TTC Street Car. They are made in space and then mapped in time relative to their speeds.

Figure 7.0. Credit:  WE Design.  Temporal map of NYC urban habitat

Figure 7.0. Credit:  WE Design.  Temporal map of NYC urban habitat

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Figure 8, 9:  Credit:  Unknown:  Various examples for how to show distribution, relationships, activities and locations.

Figure 11:  Credit:  Unknown:  Africa without its margins

Figure 10:  Credit:  Unknown:  Africa without its margins

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Figure 11:  Credit:  http://southernspaces.org:  From “Petrochemical America” by Kate Orff and Richard Misrach

 

Analyzing the Mayor’s Housing Plan – Part 1

The Association for Neighborhood & Housing Development (ANHD) founded in 1974 is a consortium of 95 neighborhood-based non-profit affordable groups in all five boroughs. They took a look at  “Housing New York“, the Mayor’s new ten-year plan for affordable housing development and will comment on it chapter-by-chapter in a series of blog posts. Up first is Fostering Livable, Diverse Neighborhoods.

A quantitative goal is easy to measure and understand – Housing New York is dedicated to building or preserving 200,000 units of affordable housing, and much of its success will be measured on its achieving that number. But the plan starts off with a qualitative goal as well – creating livable and diverse neighborhoods as a primary priority.

However, qualitative goals can be difficult to define, let alone measure. What the administration considers “livable and diverse” becomes the key to understanding the first chapter, and its overall goal of neighborhood building and community development. The Mayor’s plan makes it very clear that “livable and diverse” is a synonym for “growing and dense.”  All comprehensive neighborhood development is centered around an assumption of added density and growth and the idea that growing and dense neighborhoods will provide diversity and livability is embedded throughout the chapter and the plan as a whole. Phrases such as “work with communities to identify opportunity areas and plan for growth,” and “address neighborhood needs in new development projects” make it clear that neighborhood engagement will be in the service of growth and development. This is a stark departure from the last administration, where a great many of the rezoning initiatives – especially those undertaken in conjunction with heavy community input – were focused on contextual down zonings, rather than development. Read the entire post here and check out this chart that compares affordable housing at risk community by community.

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Housing for all New Yorkers

New York City has been in a state of housing emergency since World War II. This is defined by a vacancy rate of residential units at or below 5%. Housing has also become increasingly expensive in the city with more than half of all New Yorkers pay more than 30% of their income on housing.[1] The new mayor of New York City has set an ambitious plan for the city: To address this housing crisis by creating and preserving 200,000 units of affordable housing in the next 10 years.

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Image: My Micro NY, nArchitects

In this studio, we will explore the questions this plan puts to urban designers. What do these units look like? Where will they be? Who will live in them? We are interested in understanding the relationships between urban policies, real estate mechanisms and urban fabric and design. How do we work with these tools to envision not just apartments but complex neighborhoods in which future New Yorkers can live, work and play?

To answer these questions we will take a look at existing policies and fabrics but also at changing demographics and life styles to develop new visions for how New Yorkers live together. With an emphasis on the neighborhood as the critical unit for change embedded in the larger system of the city, we want to consider the following questions:

 

What are innovative models for housing that respond to contemporary needs of our urban society?

How do we integrate places to work, learn, exercise, shop, meet and enjoy into the neighborhoods in which we live?

What values do we attach to the places we live in that make the a home and how do we design these?

How do we incorporate thinking about energy efficiency and sustainability into new models of housing?

How can we manipulate funding streams and costs to achieve affordability for all New Yorkers?

What are the hard and soft infrastructure systems that housing needs to connect to?

How do we consider time and generations as a dimension in designing for housing and neighborhoods?

 

[1] The federal government defines “affordable” as paying 30% or less of you income on housing.

Postcards from the Future of New York City

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columbia university, new york city, NY

exhibition [8/1/2013 - 8/19/2013]
su 2013

design team: e. jackson, k.le, k.kühl, t. martin, w.meyer, m.piper, e. weidenhof
special thanks to: a.chachra, d.dobson, n.makkiya

as part of an annual exhibition, postcards from the future of new york city documents the work of 58 students within the masters of science in architecture and urban design at columbia university’s graduate school of architecture, planning, and preservation. Each week during the summer semester, students were asked to send a postcard from the future of the city as they see it evolve over next decades incorporating ideas about infrastructure and the studio’s theme of resiliency.

the gallery itself imagines the ideas of resistance and projections. resembling a forming wave, the postcards assembles and intensifies as one passes through the space. To its opposite end, an anamorphic projection is cast to distort ones view and perception. A consistent blue line sits a 6.5 feet which resembles the average storm surge in most of the flooded areas during october 29th’s hurricane sandy.

FINAL REVIEW: Applied Systems 8/9