URBAN DESIGN STUDIO II: The Regional Studio Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation

URBAN DESIGN STUDIO II: The Regional Studio
[4]Group08 – Aqua+Scape

New York City evolved from a water city into a city that
wastes its maritime infrastructure. This has not only led to
the waste of a resource but a waste of its opportunities, a
waste of connection, and a waste of its once existing water
culture.
waste_shed
Our waste shed is focused on the East River and its relationship
to the overall NY harbor, but also looks at the
adjacent land areas that are affected by the underutilization
of this major resource. It stretches onto the waterfront and
the conditions of the edges, into the divided communities,
and the broken links of the existing regional transit network
inland.
response
The waterways offer a viable alternative for transporting
goods and people in our metropolitan region. Our phasing
strategy requires us to integrate waterborne transit into the
regional transportation network. By revitalizing the water
culture, it will re-activate the working waterfront. This will
lead us to weave into the urban fabric and allow us to stitch
the communities back together, spurring economic vitality
and improving the quality of life.
strategy
The development of the New York City Maritime Transit
Service will provide new terminals along East River along
with routes to existing sites. Phase 1 of the project seeks to
upgrade existing underutilized sites and to test new possible
site locations through the application of interim barge
terminals. Phase 2 of the proposal will be completed by
2030, providing new terminals at places such as Astoria
and Roosevelt Island. Our micro strategies intend to stitch
the waterborne network into land connections, integrate
the new infrastructure, and intensify land use while promoting
mixed use. Through our process of weaving into the
urban fabric, we will address linkage issues of public space
and waterfront access while preserving the character of
each of the sites. These centers of activity will become an
asset to the communities and of the larger New York
region.

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